Belt,SEARS,Tools Home Improvement , Power Hand Tools,For,-,PRESS,ROEBUCK,tangohongkong.com,-,103.24510,Drive,/indistinguished2242015.html,$37,CRAFTSMAN,DRILL Drive Belt For - SEARS 103.24510 ROEBUCK CRAFTSMAN DRILL PRESS Max 75% OFF Belt,SEARS,Tools Home Improvement , Power Hand Tools,For,-,PRESS,ROEBUCK,tangohongkong.com,-,103.24510,Drive,/indistinguished2242015.html,$37,CRAFTSMAN,DRILL Drive Belt For - SEARS 103.24510 ROEBUCK CRAFTSMAN DRILL PRESS Max 75% OFF $37 Drive Belt For - SEARS ROEBUCK CRAFTSMAN 103.24510 DRILL PRESS - Tools Home Improvement Power Hand Tools $37 Drive Belt For - SEARS ROEBUCK CRAFTSMAN 103.24510 DRILL PRESS - Tools Home Improvement Power Hand Tools

Drive Belt For - SEARS 103.24510 ROEBUCK CRAFTSMAN DRILL PRESS Max 75% OFF 67% OFF of fixed price

Drive Belt For - SEARS ROEBUCK CRAFTSMAN 103.24510 DRILL PRESS -

$37

Drive Belt For - SEARS ROEBUCK CRAFTSMAN 103.24510 DRILL PRESS -

|||

Product description

Rubber has long been the material of choice for drive belts, mainly due to the many benefits it provides users over other materials :
Durability,
Strength,
Cost-efficiency,
Flexibility that ensures a perfect fit.

Clean the pulleys off before putting the new belt on to ensure top performance and longevity with your new belt. Inspect belts periodically and replace when worn to maintain peak performance.

Drive Belt For - SEARS ROEBUCK CRAFTSMAN 103.24510 DRILL PRESS -




Opportunities

September 2021 Opportunities: Open Calls, Residencies, and Grants for Artists

September 2, 2021

Colossal

Artwork by Felicia Chiao

Every month, Colossal shares a selection of opportunities for artists and designers, including open calls, grants, fellowships, and residencies. If you’d like to list an opportunity here, please get in touch at Handmade Reborn Baby Dolls Boy Realistic Silicone Full Body 20 i. You can also join our monthly Opportunities Newsletter.

Open Calls

Lincoln Park Gallery Without Walls Mural Project
The Lincoln Park Gallery Without Walls Mural Project will award one muralist or artist collective from Newark or the greater Newark area a $5,000 stipend to complete a public work near the historic New Ark Cathedral Church and the Dryden Mansion.
Deadline: 11:59 a.m. GMT September 7, 2021.

Young Space’s Autumn 2021 Online Exhibition
Young Space is looking for submissions across mediums for its autumn 2021 show. Geared toward early and emerging artists, the call for work is open internationally and has a pay-what-you-can application fee starting at $5.
Deadline: September 12, 2021.

Open Call for Artist Banners at the Noguchi Museum
The Noguchi Museum is looking for designs from emerging Queens-based AAPI artists that advocate for anti-racism. They will be placed on the institution’s outdoor banners. One $1,000 award will be given to the winning artist, and two runners-up will each receive $500.
Deadline: September 24, 2021.

 

Grants, Residencies, & Fellowships

Passa Ao Futuro’s Applied Arts from Nature Residency
Designed to preserve Portugal’s cultural heritage, the Applied Arts from Nature residency will task five designers and five artisans with working with traditional materials—cork, hammered copper, palm, terracotta pottery, and tiles—and techniques from the Algarve region to create new utilitarian pieces. It will take place in the Loulé Criativo space and in the artisans’ workshops in the Algarve.
Deadline: September 5, 2021.

Legler Regional Library Artist in Residence Program
During a two-year residency, one artist or artist team will be given an annual budget of $50,000 and studio space at Chicago’s Legler Regional Library to develop public art projects and art programs. It’s open to artists living or working in the city.
Deadline: September 12, 2021.

2022 Experimental Weaving Residency at Unstable Design Lab
The Unstable Design Lab will host its second experimental weaving residency from January 15 to May 15 in an effort to develop new techniques and open-source resources. Available to international applicants, the program will task one resident with will create a series of samples at the intersection of fiber arts and engineering.
Deadline: September 15, 2021.

Longform at Ox-Bow School of Art & Artists’ Residency
Designed for artists with at least five years of studio practice, Ox-Bow’s inaugural residency will bring together a cohort of 20 for a three-week-long program founded on experimental education. Longform will offer mentorship and studio space at the campus in Michigan.
Deadline: 9 a.m. EST on September 15, 2021.

Innovative Grant for Artists and Photographers
The Summer 2021 Innovative Grant will award $550 each to one photographer and one visual artist working across mediums. Applications are open internationally to anyone over 18 with a $25 fee.
Deadline: September 16, 2021.

Fort Union National Monument Residency
Applications for the October 2022 Fort Union National Monument residency are open. It’s located at one of New Mexico’s legendary and historic frontier army posts in Mora County and is accepting artists working across mediums.
Deadline: September 30, 2021.

Craft Research Fund’s Artist Fellowship
Craft Research Fund will award $20,000 to two mid-career artists, designers, or makers who identify their practice within the field of craft to support research projects. Applicants must have lived in the U.S. for the last two years.
Deadline: October 4, 2021.

Residencies for Architects, Artists, and Writers at Art Omi
Applications are open for Art Omi’s three residencies in architecture, art, and writing. Located in Columbia County, New York, each program brings together a group of creatives for cultural exchange, experimentation, and critical evaluation.
Deadline: October 15, 2021.

The Next Collective from Everlane
The clothing brand Everlane launched its first fellowship program dedicated to making the fashion industry more sustainable. Open to U.S. applicants, the Next Collective is looking for ideas to reduce virgin plastic use and will award up to five recipients a $20,000 grant and mentorship with the industry experts.
Deadline: 11:59 p.m. PDT on October 18, 2021.

The Carmignac Photojournalism Award
The 12th edition of the Carmignac Photojournalism Award centers around the social, economic, and ecological crises impacting life in Venezuela. It will award one photographer from anywhere in the world a €50,000 grant to support a six-month reporting residency running from January to June 2022 with the Fondation Carmignac, along with a traveling exhibition of the works produced and a monograph.
Deadline: Midnight GMT on October 18, 2021.

Creative Residencies at Zūnya
Open across disciplines from visual and performing arts to environmental projects and literature, Zūnya currently has two listings open for one-week and nature immersion residencies at its Costa Rican space. The former is fully funded and centered on collaborative learning, while the latter runs at least one month with a focus on project development.
Deadline: Rolling.

Emergency Grants from Foundation for Contemporary Arts
Emergency Grants is a multi-disciplinary program offering $500 to $3,000 grants to artists living and working anywhere in the United States for projects occurring in the U.S. and abroad. It’s designed to mitigate hardship when there is insufficient time to seek other sources of funding or when unexpected expenses occur.
Deadline: Rolling.

 

 



Art

Coral and Plant Life Consume Discarded Objects in Post-Apocalyptic Sculptures by Stéphanie Kilgast

SSAGSVBINQAnslx Mens Sandles Comfortable, Men's Casual Sandals a

Grace Ebert

“Coral Royal” (2019), epoxy clay, acrylics on tin can, 14 x 15 x 11 centimeters. All images © Stéphanie Kilgast, shared with permission

Artist Stéphanie Kilgast (previously) envisions a vibrant, post-apocalyptic world overgrown with coral, fungi, and lush moss. Using cheap devices and disposable containers that tend to outlast their original function as her base, Kilgast creates painted-clay assemblages that are teeming with fantastical colors and texture: mushrooms sprout from an empty paint tube, sea creatures envelop a crushed can, and plant life cloaks a pair of headphones with whimsical botanicals.

Each of the works contrasts the enduring manufactured object with natural growth, imagining a universe that’s simultaneously devoid of humanity and still marred by its rampant consumption habits. “In that sense my work is joyous. I remove the root of the problem, us, and let all the other species just grow over our mistakes,” she shares. “Nature itself is full of bright colors. It’s inherently beautiful, and my work is an ode to all the living and existing species, (except) for us. Hope dies last, so I still hope my work opens up discussion, thinking, and eventually change.”

Currently based in Vannes, France, Kilgast has exhibitions at Comoedia in Brest, France, Modern Eden in San Francisco, and three at Melbourne’s Beinart Gallery slated for 2022. She also shares much of her process on YouTube and Instagram.

 

“Quinacridone Magenta” (2021), cold porcelain, epoxy clay, acrylics, wire on empty paint tube, 10 x 7 x 13 centimeters

“Cyltonic” (2018), polymer clay, acrylics, wire, thrifted can of cleaning agent, 17 x 9 x 19 centimeters

Top left: “Blue Boletus” (2020), polymer clay, acrylics, wire on tin can, 25 x 14 x 10 centimeters. Top right: “Serene” (2020), epoxy clay, polymer clay, acrylics, wire on empty acrylic plastic bottle, 25 x 12 x 17 centimeters. Bottom left: “Yellow Exploration (Octopus)” (2020), epoxy clay, polymer clay, acrylics on empty acrylic plastic bottle, 32 x 16 x 15 centimeters and “Blue Bottle (Coral Reef)” (2020), epoxy clay, polymer clay, acrylics on empty acrylic plastic bottle, 35 x 15 x 11 centimeters. Bottom right: “Mojito” (2019), poxy clay, polymer clay, acrylics on tin can, 17 x 17 x 7 centimeters

“Losing My Song Culture” (2021), epoxy clay, air-dry clay, cold porcelain, paper, watercolor, acrylics, on broken headphones, 28 x 18 x 17 centimeters

Detail of “Blue Bottle (Coral Reef)” (2020), epoxy clay, polymer clay, acrylics on empty acrylic plastic bottle, 35 x 15 x 11 centimeters

“Mother (Elephants)” (2019), epoxy clay, polymer clay, acrylics, wire, thrifted plastic canteen, 17 x 14 x 26 centimeters

 

 



Art Science

Bees Embed Ava Roth's Organic Mixed-Media Artworks in Waxy Honeycomb

September 2, 2021

Grace Ebert

“Honeybee Collaboration: Tulip Tree Leaf and French Knots,” natural honeycomb, paper, encaustic medium, leaf, thread in Canadian Maple frame, 17.5 x 17.5 inches. All images © Ava Roth, shared with permission

In collaboration with master beekeeper Mylee Nordin and swarms of the honey-producing insects, artist Ava Roth develops elaborate encaustic works that literally visualize the interaction between humans and the environment. The Toronto-based artist stitches small collages with leaves, twigs, rose quartz, porcupine quills, and other organic matter before handing control over to her six-legged counterparts, who faithfully build hexagonal cells around the original piece. Once complete, the waxy inter-species works are brimming with texture and color variances that highlight the inherent beauty and unpredictability of nature.

Whereas previous iterations of Roth’s embroideries used stock hoops at the center, she now enlists the help of woodworker Bernoel Quintos, who custom-makes inner and outer frames in the same dimensions that are typical in Langstroth hives. “Each piece requires some kind of border that separates my work from the bees’ work,” she says. “This (change) has allowed me to experiment with different sizes and shapes and has helped to make every aspect of my work hand (or bee) crafted.”

 

Detail of “Honeybee Collaboration: Honeycomb and Twigs,” natural honeycomb, paper, encaustic medium, twigs, thread, gold seed beads in Canadian Pine frame, 17.5 x 17.5 inches

Roth tells Colossal that although it’s possible to manipulate the hive conditions to produce a 3D honeycomb or work with artificial elements, she creates self-imposed limits to use only organic materials and engender environments that mimic those bees would gravitate toward naturally. She explains:

I recognize that Langstroth hives are not a natural habitat for bees, but neither are most of the spaces that humans find themselves occupying right now. Ultimately, this project is about exploring the ways in which humans collide with the natural environment today and finding ways to make making something beautiful from this specific time and place. This means working in cities, in manufactured hives, in the midst of enormous environmental and political despair.

Roth will be pulling multiple pieces from her hives in the next few weeks, and you can follow that progress on Instagram. She also has a few works on paper currently available at Wallspace Gallery in Ottawa.

 

“Honeybee Collaboration: Honeycomb and Twigs,” natural honeycomb, paper, encaustic medium, twigs, thread, gold seed beads in Canadian Pine frame, 17.5 x 17.5 inches

“Honeybee Collaboration: Rose Quartz and Porcupine Quills,” natural honeycomb, paper, encaustic medium, rose quartz, porcupine quills, thread in Canadian Maple frame, 17.5 x 17.5 inches

“Honeybee Collaboration: Porcupine Quills and Thread,” natural honeycomb, paper, encaustic medium, porcupine quills, thread in Canadian Maple frame, 17.5 x 17.5 inches

“Honeybee Collaboration: Twigs and French Knots,” natural honeycomb, paper, encaustic medium, twigs, gold leaf, thread in Canadian Maple frame, 17.5 x 17.5 inches

“Porcupine quills, Green and Gold,” encaustic, Japanese tissue, porcupine quills, seed beads and thread in an embroidery hoop, embedded in honeycomb, 17.5 x 17.5 inches

 

 



Documentary ZZZYYY 1Set Universal Large Motorcycle Frame Sliders Anti Crash Science

A Short Film Dives into the 15-Year Process Behind the Documentary 'Fantastic Fungi'

September 1, 2021

Grace Ebert

We shared footage of the mesmerizing mycelium networks pulsing underneath our feet back in 2019 to mark the opening of Louie Schwartzberg’s Fantastic Fungi, and now the dedicated director takes viewers behind the scenes to show his painstaking process. Filmed throughout a 15-year period in his home studio, Schwartzberg’s timelapses zero in on myriad spores as they burst open, sprawl in every direction, and morph in color and texture. They’re a compelling visual representation of time and nature’s cyclical processes, which he explores in a new short film produced by WIRED.

Most of the challenges in capturing the footage center around predicting where an organism will grow to keep it within the shot and understanding the frame rates of different lifeforms. Schwartzberg explains:

For example, a mosquito on your arm, having a little drop of blood, takes a look at that hand coming towards it in ultra slow motion and has plenty of time to take off because its metabolic rate, its lifespan, is way shorter than our lifespan. And our lifespan is way shorter than a Redwood tree’s lifespan. This reality of real-time human point of view is not the only point of view, and that’s really the beauty of cameras and time-lapse cinematography. It’s actually a time machine.

Watch the full making-of above—note that it does include a clip of a mouse decomposing near the end—and find Fantastic Fungi on Netflix. (via The Kids Should See This)

 

 

 



US Fairytailes Ball Gown Strapless Formal Prom Wedding Dress #25

Origins: Striking Photos Document the Sights of Contemporary Conservation Efforts

September 1, 2021

Grace Ebert

“Ice Waterfall” by Paul Nicklen. All images courtesy of Hilton Asmus Contemporary, shared with permission

Spanning the icy downpours of the Norwegian archipelago Svalbard to the intimate portraits of the people of Papua New Guinea, the profound photographs that comprise an exhibition at Hilton Asmus Contemporary in Chicago are a perceptive consideration of the issues at the center of today’s conservation efforts. Titled Origins, the show brings together the work of artists and marine biologists Cristina Mittermeier and Paul Nicklen, who pair their creative practices with their work at the nonprofit Sea Legacy.

Co-founded by the duo in 2014, the organization is dedicated to preserving the oceans, using “their inspiring imagery to convert apathy into action and to drive powerful conservation wins across the globe,” a statement reads. A testament to the landscapes and ecologies worth preserving, the stunning photos document global crises and the tender, joyful moments of people around the world, and their subjects range from a Lisu woman in China’s Yunnan Province carrying her pet duck to the crumbling icebergs of Antarctica.

Origins is up through October 2 both virtually and in-person at the Bridgeport gallery. You can find more from Mittermeier and Nicklen on Instagram.

 

“Bubblegum” by Cristina Mittermeier

“Lady with the Goose II” by Cristina Mittermeier

“Megaptera” by Paul Nicklen

“Adrift” by Cristina Mittermeier

“Frozen Highway” by Paul Nicklen

“Alone Together” by Cristina Mittermeier

“Leap Of Faith” by Cristina Mittermeier

 

 



Art

Launched in Detroit This Summer, A Black-Led Mural Festival Wants to Revitalize Neighborhoods with Public Art

September 1, 2021

Grace Ebert

Max Sansing. All images courtesy of BLKOUT Walls, shared with permission

Murals have long been associated with placemaking because of their unparalleled ability to transform underutilized corridors and city stretches into spaces primed for cultural gatherings, tourism, and subsequently, economic growth. This revitalizing potential is what drives a biannual festival that launched in Detroit earlier this summer as it dramatically altered the urban landscape of the city’s central North End neighborhood.

Back in July, BLKOUT Walls saw the work of 19 muralists produced across the area, which was once regarded as an entertainment hub that produced famed Motown talents like including Smokey Robinson, Diana Ross, the Four Tops, and Aretha Franklin. Participating were visiting artists like Sentrock (previously) and Detroit natives like Tylonn J. Sawyer, Bakpak Durden, and Sydney James, who co-founded the festival with Chicago’s Max Sansing (previously) and Thomas Evans, aka Detour 303.

The resulting works span a range of themes and styles from Sansing’s sprawling technicolor creations to Tony Whgln’s whimsical botanicals to James’s contemporary twist on “Girl with the Pearl Earring,” which turns the iconic Vermeer into a subversive portrait of artist Halima Cassells. Swapping the white gem for a large “D” and cloaking her garment in patches, James’s revision is an homage to Detroit and its people.

 

Sentrock. Image courtesy of the artist

Whereas other festivals don’t always prioritize racial diversity or pay their artists, organizers wanted to bake those tenets into BLKOUT Walls’s mission. The Black-led event prioritizes artists of color with the idea of “mirroring the demographics of the city of Detroit and thereby creating a cohort of artists representing equity and inclusion,” a statement says. Beyond representation, though, organizers also recognize the necessity of monetary support as key to lasting change, which James explains:

As an artist, I understand the importance of being paid for my experience and ability, especially as artists are often treated like we are supposed to work for free. What we do as public artists brings economic value to the area as economic development tends to follow, so it is imperative that we be compensated for not only the work we do but also the impact we have on the community and economy.

In addition to rejuvenating the area, BLKOUT Walls was designed for public engagement, with the weeklong festival schedule packed with live painting sessions, talks, walking tours, and a block party to celebrate its close. On the final day alone, it attracted more than 8,000 visitors, a testament to its power to draw patrons to nearby establishments and have a reverberating impact on the local economy.

 

Rick Williams

Now having completed the inaugural event, co-organizer Che Anderson tells Colossal that the team envisions BLKOUT Walls traveling to cities like Chicago, Oakland, Memphis, Boston, Atlanta, and Charleston. “Our intent is to have a biannual festival in Detroit like a family reunion. In between those events, we’d like to host a festival somewhere else in the world to engage other Black communities,” he says.

If you’re in Detroit, check out the BLKOUT Walls map to tour the completed works, and follow the festival on Instagram to find out where it’s headed next. (via Hyperallergic)

 

Tony Whgln

Bakpak Durden

Zoë Boston

Just

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight